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of Inuit Health in Canada: A discussion paper

Overall, three of the social determinants in this study were significantly associated with health for both younger Inuit and those These were the strength of family ties, educational attainment and obesity. Strong or very strong family ties were associated with higher levels of excellent or very good health, while those with less than a high school education and those who were obese were associated with lower levels of excellent or very good health.

Richmond, Chantelle A.M. (2009). The Social Determinants of Inuit Health: A Focus on Social Support in the Canadian Arctic. International Journal of Circumpolar Health,

Economic Environment of Health Care in Canada.” Discussion Paper No

Inuit health in Canada: a discussion paper.

for the World Health Organization Commission on Social Determinants of Health (Discussion Paper).

Infectious diseases were reported in 25 papers representing 35% of the papers included in the review. The majority of these (72%) focused on child health (). Eight papers focused on youth. This represented the largest proportion of the youth literature, at 33% (). Opposite to the experience among the Innu of Newfoundland and Labrador, women of Inuit communities in the region were hospitalization due to pneumonia more often than men (). Hospital admission for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) was approximately 11 times more frequent in Nunavik than in other Canadian regions (). Within the Arctic regions of Canada and the United States, indigenous children had the highest rates of Haemophilus influenzae, serotype a (). Rates of HPV were high among Inuit women compared to other women in Canada and the diversity in HPV types may contribute to the overall burden of infection among Inuit women (). Factors associated with the high risk HPV were younger age and having 11 or more lifetime sexual partners (). One study examined factors that were associated with zoonotic infections, specifically Toxoplasma gondii, and demonstrated that age, gender, schooling, and community of residence each influenced serostatus (). A case study that examined characteristics that may be associated with sexually transmitted infections among Inuit youth discussed that, among other things, conversations that once occurred between generations about matters related to reproduction are no longer taking place (). This knowledge gap about sexual health for Inuit youth was referred to elsewhere as well ().

Inuit Canadians are on average about 20 years younger and have a 10-year lower life expectancy than other Canadians. While there have been improvements in Inuit health status over time, significant health disparities still remain. This paper will review the peer-reviewed literature related to Inuit child, youth, and maternal health between 2000 and 2010, investigate which thematic areas were examined, and determine what proportion of the research is related to each group. Establishing areas of research concentrations and scarcities may help direct future research where it is needed. We followed a systematic literature review and employed peer-reviewed research literature on child, youth, and maternal health which were selected from 3 sources, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Circumpolar Health Bibliographic Database. The resulting references were read, and summarized according to population group and thematic area. The thematic areas that emerged by frequency were: infectious disease; environment/environmental exposures; nutrition; birth outcomes; tobacco; chronic disease; health care; policy, human resources; interventions/programming; social determinants of health; mental health and wellbeing; genetics; injury; and dental health. The 72 papers that met the inclusion criteria were not mutually exclusive with respect to group studied. Fifty-nine papers (82%) concerned child health, 24 papers (33%) youth health, and 58 papers (81%) maternal health. The review documented high incidences of illness and significant public health problems; however, in the context of these issues, opportunities to develop research that could directly enhance health outcomes are explored.

SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF INUIT HEALTH IN CANADA ..

Objective Over past decades, Australian and Canadian Indigenous primary healthcare policies have focused on supporting community controlled Indigenous health organisations. After more than 20 years of sustained effort, over 89% of eligible communities in Canada are currently engaged in the planning, management and provision of community controlled health services. In Australia, policy commitment to community control has also been in place for more than 25 years, but implementation has been complicated by unrealistic timelines, underdeveloped change management processes, inflexible funding agreements and distrust. This paper discusses the lessons from the Canadian experience to inform the continuing efforts to achieve the implementation of community control in Australia.

Determinants of inuit health in canada a discussion paper

The white paper of 1969 proposed the shelving of treaties and the transfer of responsibility for all health and social services for First Nations and Inuit peoples to the provinces (Government of Canada 1969) The white paper received resounding criticism from the First Nations, and it was withdrawn, although many of the proposed actions for assimilation continue through a gradual withdrawal of federal services. The Constitution Act of 1982 reaffirmed the existing Aboriginal and treaty rights, and recognized First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples as the Aboriginal peoples of Canada.

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Determinants Of Inuit Health In Canada A Discussion Paper


Aug 05, 2013 · Objective

Canada's original people consist of First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples. Their estimated population is 1.17 million. The total fertility rate for the period 1996–2001 was 2.6 for Aboriginal women versus 1.5 for Canada (Statistics Canada 2006). Thus, a high proportion of this rapidly growing segment of the population are children. Numerous articles have reviewed the health status of Canada's Aboriginal children and shown comparatively high prevalence and incidence of most of the common diseases that affect children. This article highlights some of the more specific disparities, but also attempts to provide some historical context and a few composite case studies that illustrate how the social determinants, colonialism, jurisdictional issues, geography and healthcare can interact to amplify disproportionately the disadvantage these children have in so many ways. Much of the historical detail recounts the contact with First Nations people, the most numerous and the first group to have contact with European settlement.

Introduction: Mandate, Context and Consultation Process

The white paper of 1969 proposed the shelving of treaties and the transfer of responsibility for all health and social services for First Nations and Inuit peoples to the provinces (Government of Canada 1969) The white paper received resounding criticism from the First Nations, and it was withdrawn, although many of the proposed actions for assimilation continue through a gradual withdrawal of federal services. The Constitution Act of 1982 reaffirmed the existing Aboriginal and treaty rights, and recognized First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples as the Aboriginal peoples of Canada.

Determinants of Indigenous Peoples' Health in Canada …

Canada's original people consist of First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples. Their estimated population is 1.17 million. The total fertility rate for the period 1996–2001 was 2.6 for Aboriginal women versus 1.5 for Canada (Statistics Canada 2006). Thus, a high proportion of this rapidly growing segment of the population are children. Numerous articles have reviewed the health status of Canada's Aboriginal children and shown comparatively high prevalence and incidence of most of the common diseases that affect children. This article highlights some of the more specific disparities, but also attempts to provide some historical context and a few composite case studies that illustrate how the social determinants, colonialism, jurisdictional issues, geography and healthcare can interact to amplify disproportionately the disadvantage these children have in so many ways. Much of the historical detail recounts the contact with First Nations people, the most numerous and the first group to have contact with European settlement.

Assessing the social determinants of ..

The preventable death in 2012 of Burton Winters, an Inuit adolescent who perished after becoming lost the sea ice in Labrador, Canada, resonated widely with Canadians, making national headlines as people expressed their sadness and outrage []. Despite the increase in public attention on travel safety and search and rescue (SAR) in Canada’s Arctic, and ongoing reports from northern communities about increasing injuries related to environmental changes [,], there are still major gaps in our knowledge of factors contributing to land-based injury and trauma in the North (meaning occurring on land, ice, or water). Understanding these determinants is critical for mitigating unintentional injury and trauma and may help prevent deaths like this from occurring in the future.

Assessing the social determinants of self-reported Inuit ..

The future of life on Earth cannot be taken for granted as our species has the capacity to influence that future – for good or ill. This paper is not the definitive word on the topic of the ecological determinants of health. Its goal is to begin a conversation, stimulate debate and ultimately motivate the public health community to action.

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